Can a Superior Product Outweigh Poor Service?

I love burgers.  In my humble opinion, Five Guys Burgers and Fries has one of the best for a big chain.  And there is one a stone’s throw away from our office, which practically makes me salivate every time I look out the window.

burger
Whats not to love about burger and fries?

 

The problem, obviously, isn’t the amazing taste or the distance I must travel to get my burger.  In this case, the problem is the service.  I have experienced a problem each of the five most recent times I have been there.   5-for-5.  100%.  I even called ahead after the third time it happened to make sure it didn’t happen again.  And it did.  Two. More. Times.

So, why do I keep going back?  Am I a glutton for disappointment?  Do I have another personality that likes things a certain way?  Maybe I just want to see how long it will take these morons to get it right.  Or, maybe, there are five little invisible aliens in each store hellbent on ruining everyone’s order so that we’ll stop eating so much red meat.  Is Chick-fil-A behind all this?? I digress.

The real reason is simple: The burger is too damn good to not have just because I don’t get it the way I wanted it.

Everyone has got to get their hands on Five Guys. Or webbed feet.

 

The power of a superior product is unmatched.  It creates a following, an addiction.  It will turn a company lost in a sea of similar competitors into a stand-out.  Great service is an absolute necessity, but for those companies putting more weight on service than on product, maybe their real product is the service they provide.

While Last Call puts integrity and customer service at the forefront of its focus, as I’m sure the fine folks at Five Guys Corporate would also say, we work incredibly hard to put out products that, hopefully, our clients and players are as passionate as I am about that burger, even if we don’t always get it right.