Seinfeld Trivia Study Guide:
People and Places

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Among all the TV show themed Trivia in the world, Seinfeld is a classic. The much-loved comedy is chock-full of quirky characters and all their fun facets. 


Given that the show ran for a solid 9 seasons, there is no shortage of shenanigans. More shenanigans means more for you to remember when it comes to Seinfeld Trivia. But don’t worry, we’ve got you covered.

People

Jerry Seinfeld

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  • Jerry is the straight man, a figure who is “able to observe the chaos around him but not always be a part of it.”
  • A recurring joke is Jerry behaving callously towards Elaine (whom he once dated). This includes not helping her carry groceries or heavy objects, ignoring her when she is upset, and on one occasion taking a first class upgrade on a flight for himself, leaving Elaine in economy.
  • Jerry is also the only main character on the show to maintain the same career (a stand-up comedian) throughout the series.
  • Jerry’s parents are Morty and Helen Seinfeld, a retired Jewish couple living in Florida. Although Jerry identifies as a Jew, he doesn’t practice much.
  • After college, Jerry briefly worked as an umbrella salesman and claims to have invented the “twirl” to make the umbrella look more attractive.
  • Jerry also has an obsessive insistence on cleanliness and neatness and much of the show’s action takes place in Jerry’s apartment (located at 129 West 81st Street, apartment 5A).
  • Elaine also has a very refined taste in film, citing many movies, plays, and characters throughout the series. She has a particular affection for A Streetcar Named Desire.
  • Unlike George, Jerry and Kramer, Elaine is not a native of New York City. Having grown up in an affluent Baltimore suburb, she is shown to be a fan of the Baltimore Orioles.
  • Early in the series, Elaine lives with a roommate Tina. Later on, she lives on her own at 16 W. 75th St., Apt. 2G and 78 W. 86th St., Apt. 3E.
  • Elaine was based in part on Susan McNabb (who was dating Seinfeld when the character was created), though was eventually named after friend and fellow comic Elayne Boosler.
  • Also, the character was partially based on Monica Yates, daughter of novelist Richard Yates, whom Larry David once dated.

Elaine Benes

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  • Intelligent and assertive serial dater, Elaine is the only main character not to own a car, as well as the only character whose mother does not appear in the show.
  • Elaine also has a very refined taste in film, citing many movies, plays, and characters throughout the series. She has a particular affection for A Streetcar Named Desire.
  • Unlike George, Jerry and Kramer, Elaine is not a native of New York City. Having grown up in an affluent Baltimore suburb, 
    she is shown to be a fan of the Baltimore Orioles.
  • Early in the series, Elaine lives with a roommate Tina. Later on, she lives on her own at 16 W. 75th St., Apt. 2G and 78 W. 86th St., Apt. 3E.
  • Elaine was based in part on Susan McNabb (who was dating Seinfeld when the character was created), though was eventually named after friend and fellow comic Elayne Boosler.
  • Also, the character was partially based on Monica Yates, daughter of novelist Richard Yates, whom Larry David once dated.

Cosmo Kramer

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  • A high school dropout, Kramer grew up in a strict household where he had to be in bed every night by 9:00PM.
  • He ran away from home at age seventeen and stowed away aboard a steamer bound for Sweden.
  • He is the only main character on the show whose dad never makes an appearance.
  • Kramer has a liking for smoking Cuban cigars.
  • His relationship with Newman is defined from the start in “The Suicide”, where they get along very well.
  • Additionally, of the four main characters, Kramer has the fewest on-screen romantic relationships.
  • Kramer reveals to Jerry that in 1979 he was struck on the head by a falling air conditioner while walking on the sidewalk, which might explain his eccentric behavior.
  • The character is loosely based on comedian Kenny Kramer, Larry David’s ex-neighbor. Larry David was hesitant to use Kenny Kramer’s real name, as he suspected that Kramer would take advantage of this. David’s suspicion turned out to be correct and Kenny Kramer created the “Kramer Reality Tour”, a New York City bus tour that points out actual locations of events or places featured in Seinfeld.
  • Kramer’s apartment is also the subject of many radical experiments in interior design. Oftentimes, the “experiments” never reach completion due to Kramer’s inherent short-attention span.
  • Some of his invention ideas include a coffee table book about coffee tables, beach-scented cologne, a concept restaurant that only serves peanut butter and jelly sandwiches (which he calls P.B. & Js), and a bra for men called the “bro” or the “manssiere”.

George Costanza

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  • The character was originally based on Seinfeld co-creator Larry David, but is named after Jerry Seinfeld’s real-life New York friend, Mike Costanza. In 1998, Michael Costanza sued the show for $100,000,000, claiming that he never gave permission for his name to be used.
  • Many of George’s predicaments were also based on Larry David’s past real-life experiences.
  • George’s character met Jerry during his youth, where they both attended John F. Kennedy High School class of 1971 and remained friends from that point on.
  • During their high school years, George and Jerry frequently hung out at a pizzeria called Mario’s Pizzas, where George would play Frogger.
  • George’s occasional impulsiveness often gets him into trouble.
  • Among his other quirks, he has an interest in nice restrooms and his personal bathroom habits border on obsession. In fact, he claims to have an encyclopedic knowledge of the locations of the best public bathrooms in the city.
  • George’s professional life is unstable. His original job when the series starts is as a real estate agent, but after that he is unable to remain in any job for any great length of time. He is unemployed for a large amount of time throughout the series.
  • Also, his longest romantic relationship was with his fiancee, Susan Biddle Ross.

Ruthie Cohen

  • Other than the main cast, she appears in the most episodes of the show as a cashier at Monk’s Cafe.
  • The characters is named after the actress who played her.

Newman

  • Occasional antagonist on the show, Newman resides in the same apartment building as Jerry and often schemes against him.
  • Newman’s dislike of Jerry appears to stem from resentment at Jerry’s status as a relatively famous comedian and he believes Jerry is undeserving of his fame.
  • Newman is an employee of the United States Postal Service and claims that he once worked the same postal route as American serial killer David Berkowitz, otherwise known as the “Son of Sam”, who was working for the Postal Service at the time of his 1977 capture.

Places

Monk’s Cafe

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  • The exterior of Tom’s Restaurant on the corner of West 112th Street and Broadway, is often shown on the show as the exterior of Monk’s.
  • The restaurant consists of some booths, tables, and a counter. Jerry, Elaine, George and Kramer normally sit in the first or second booth from the entrance.
  • The owner of the fictional café is Larry the Cook, played by Lawrence Mandley.
  • Jerry Seinfeld and writer Larry David called the coffee shop Monk’s because there was a poster of the jazz pianist Thelonious Monk in the office in which they wrote the show.

Al’s Soup Kitchen

  • The Original Soupman is a chain of soup restaurants run by Ali “Al” Yeganeh and modeled after Yeganeh’s original restaurant Soup Kitchen International.
  • Yeganeh was the inspiration for the “Soup Nazi” character.
  • Yeganeh, fictionalized as “Yev Kassem”, is portrayed as the tyrannical owner, making all of his customers follow a strict set of rules if they want some of his soup: Pick the soup you want! Have your money ready! Move to the extreme left after ordering! Otherwise, “No soup for you!”
  • According to writer Spike Feresten, Jerry Seinfeld and several members of the production team went to Soup Kitchen International for lunch weeks after “The Soup Nazi” aired. Upon recognizing Seinfeld, Yeganeh went into a profanity-filled rant about how the show had “ruined” his business and demanded an apology. Seinfeld gave what Feresten describes as “the most insincere, sarcastic apology ever given”. Yeganeh then yelled, “No soup for you!” and ejected them from the restaurant.

H&H Bagels

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  • Kramer’s workplace, of which he was on strike from for 12 years. After the strike ends, he returns to work.
  • Kramer then requests to have off of work to celebrate Festivus (an invented holiday by George’s father) and is denied, so he goes back on strike, picketing outside the store.
  • While on strike, Kramer sabotages the bagel machine causing a steam vent to burst inside the store which causes Elaine to appear unattractive while she is waiting to hear from a man she accidentally gave her free sandwich coupon card to with a fake number written on it (which happened to be the number of H&H bagels).

Champagne Video

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  • Champagne Video at 213 West 79th is visited frequently by the Seinfeld characters.
  • Most famously, this is where George rented Home Alone and Rochelle Rochelle.
  • This is also the place where Elaine falls in love with one of the store employees. Due to his impeccable taste in movies, she thinks they are destined to be together, until it turns out he is a 15 year old boy named Vincent.

Papaya King

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  • Known also by Gray’s Papaya at another location.
  • As the gang stands in a seemingly endless line to see the fictional movie Checkmate, Kramer gets a case of the munchies. Rather than waiting for cinematic snacks, he insists he’s got to get a hot dog from Papaya King.

Sardi’s

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  • Sardi’s is best known as the caricature-covered Times Square restaurant frequented by the after-theatre Broadway crowd and on-stage stars.
  • Kramer famously attends the Tony Awards as a seat-filler, only to be mistakenly invited onstage with the producers of faux-musical Scarsdale Surprise.
  • Kramer runs with this turn of events and begins to carry his award around, using it to get a table at Sardi’s. He’s then confronted by the Scarsdale Surprise show runners as a phony.

Hopefully this “people and places” study guide refreshed your Seinfeld memory. Be prepared to dominate Seinfeld Trivia Night! To find a Seinfeld Trivia Night near you, click here.

Brittani Rable

Brittani Rable

I am a creative soul by nature and love doing anything I can put my mind to from graphics and writing to embroidery and photography. I love trying new things and enjoy the thrill of a good challenge, whether that be in the form of a trivia question or attempting to learn Japanese.

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